Archive for the ‘Oro Valley’ Category

Dearly Departed

April 5, 2017

No, they’re not dead, just gone.  “My” baby doves got so big Mom couldn’t fit in the “nest” (a small pile of twigs) any more, but stopped by occasionally to give them some pigeon milk.  That was something I didn’t know about previously.  According to Wikipedia:

Crop milk is a secretion from the lining of the crop of parent birds that is regurgitated to young birds. It is found among all pigeons and doves where it is referred to as pigeon milk…

Then I didn’t see them in their nest, so I went out to trim some bushes outside the window of my breakfast room (which I am using for an office), and they were sitting on the windowsill, across the narrow side yard from their nest.  But I had upset them, so they flew away.  They returned in the evening twice to the wall outside the kitchen, but I think Mom had decided that they could be on their own, so they’re gone.


A week ago it was so windy that people with respiratory problems, old people, and young children were asked to stay indoors and refrain from exercise.  I heard that on the news as I was driving to the Y to exercise.  The mountains were almost obscured, but I still loved looking at them.

The soil is pretty sandy here, which is maybe why the cactus grow so large.  Here are three on my street, on the walk to the mailboxes.  The biggest yucca and century plant I have ever seen, up to the house eves!  And a plump and happy saguaro.

Spring has hit Tucson with a splash of yellow.  It started with the brittlebush and desert marigolds at the side of the roads (with  an occasional slash of red or pink penstemon), then on to the palo verdes, heavy with flowers (with intermittent stripes of gaudy magenta bougainvillea – this in my back yard, the same color as all of the bougainvilleas in my subdivision).

I stopped in a parking lot yesterday to take these photos with my phone, but the wind was blowing pretty hard, so they look “painterly”.  The blooms started in the washes, and have been climbing up to the higher elevations.  Beautiful along La Cañada and La Cholla, and River Road especially!  Oro Valley is a bit higher than Tucson, so my three palo verdes are still covered with buds.

Seen Today

A quail couple, apparently looking for a suitable place to nest, he on the fence, alert for predators, but giving his mate helpful suggestions, she checking out the purple Mexican petunia in the backyard.  (These beautiful flowers only last one day.)

A bulky guy with blond hair past his shoulders, in shorts, shirt tied about his waist, walking along the road.  (It was cool this morning, and I was wearing a sweater!)

The area behind the fenced-in part of the back yard is riddled with holes.  Saw the first round-tailed ground squirrel today, but he didn’t stick around for a photo op.

Sculptor Ira Weisenfeld’s Boat in a Tree, on Wetmore.  Must take my own photo of it.  This from the sculptor’s website, https://www.circleofironforge.com/about-me.

Ubiquitous clutches of cyclists in colorful lycra.

At a light, a taxi-yellow sports car in front of one of the palo verdes overladen with yellow.  I was turning, and couldn’t stop for a photo.

A roadrunner skittering along the outside of the fence.  There are now many lizards in the yard, a few zebra-tailed lizards recently (this photo from Wikipedia), so I was surprised he didn’t want to venture in.  Maybe the 18″ of chicken wire wrapped around the base of the wrought iron fence deterred him, although he could have jumped over.

A hawk sitting on a power line, watching the traffic on La Cholla go by.  Looked like the hawk on the cover of the book I recently finished, H Is For Hawk, by Helen Macdonald.

Equal Pay Day

March 24, 2017

The next Equal Pay Day is Tuesday, April 4, 2017. This date symbolizes how far into the year women must work to earn what men earned in the previous year.1

I just got this email from the American Association of University Women:

April 4 is Equal Pay Day, and to mark this powerful day of action AAUW is offering a discounted introductory membership rate of just $21, of which $19 is tax deductible.
Right now the pay gap is so wide and closing so slowly that women will have to wait 135 years to receive equal pay. If we don’t step up now, the gender pay gap won’t close until the year 2152! I know you think that’s unacceptable, so please join.

This link has my code for your discount:
https://ww2.aauw.org/national-join/?appealcode=D17CEL1003A

Seen This Month

A woman driving a small silver BMW convertible with the top down, a tiny gold glitter Mickey Mouse cap at the top of its aerial.  It is cool and threatening rain yesterday, but a few days ago, when the weather was in the 90’s, I also saw two other convertibles with their tops down.

Then there was the young man leaving the Y with his two-year-old daughter on his arm, explaining why the car in the parking lot had no roof.  Why doesn’t it have a roof? He replied, So the wind can blow through your hair.

A dove made a typically flimsy nest near my kitchen window.  It laid two eggs and now has two young’uns.

I’ve been here a month and the lizards are just coming back into the yard.  The previous renters had a dog and the lizards have just figured out that the dog’s no longer a threat.

Lambert Lane, my east/west artery, is closed for three months, to widen it from two lanes to four.  But before they closed it, we were driving 25 mph as construction workers played in the dirt on each side, scraping away any plant life, moving dirt, concreting a hillside, and so on.  Was checking out a house right next to the construction – three coyotes were on the steep driveway, checking out something in the lot further on.  Usually when you see three together, it’s a mother and two pups.  These pups were well-grown.

There were a few items in this “new” house that had not been cleaned in a while.  One was the small storage shed.  Found, in addition to all of the screens that had fallen off the windows (’cause they had been velcroed on, and the velco had dried up), three desiccated pack rats, what looked like a mother and her pups.  Plus all of the stuff they had chewed up, along with the droppings.  Yuck!  (No – I did not take a photo, but here is one of my potted flowers, grass, and herbs, very happy to have morning sun.)

STILLNESS

The Louis Carlos Bernal Gallery, at the Pima College West Campus, had a showing which ended at the beginning of this month, STILLNESS. Our Contemporary Art Society went to the reception.  I love these descriptions from the Tucson Weekly.  (My photos were just taken with my phone.)

Kate Breakey, an internationally known photographer, lives in the desert outside Tucson. She makes gorgeous photos of desert moons and of the ocean waters of her native Australia, but most often, as she does here, she zeroes in on lifeless animals.

Constantly trying out new media, this time she has used waxy encaustic paint and pencil atop the black-and-white archival digital prints of her new series, Taxonomy of Memory, a wall-full of 34 works. The encaustics add a creamy texture to her views of the desert’s dead… a vermillion flycatcher…  She lays out small corpses that she finds on trails, and makes haunting pictures of them, blowing them up to grand proportions. As she writes, “A thing fills with exactly the radiance you accord it.”

Colin Blakely, newish head of the UA School of Art—he started in 2015—makes his community debut with an elegant suite of landscape photos…  Blakely’s “Yosemite Valley” is after an 1875 oil by Bierstadt, who painted Yosemite over and over. Both painters helped mythologize the monumental landscapes of the new American nation; in their art of the sublime, the grandeur of a thundering waterfall or a soaring western peak suggested the greatness of America.

Blakely contends that these mythical place exist in some ways only in “our collective cultural imagination.” To “disrupt” those familiar landscapes, he switches the medium from classic oils to archival pigment prints spit out by a computer printers. He ratchets up or tones down the color, and even shifts some elements in the compositions.

…a fairytale forest of golden trees.  In this dazzling installation by Sean-Paul Pluguez, no fewer than 100 “trees” are lined up neatly, row on row, planted into low birch platforms. Bending slightly, as real trees do, they curve upward toward an imagined sky, reaching about six feet into the air.

The trees are actually grape stakes, rough wooden posts that normally would be used to hold up grape vines in a vineyard. But they’ve been transformed by glimmering 24-carat gold leaf, painstakingly applied by the artist over the course of a year. The gold catches the light, and it’s thick and textured, dipping into hollows in the stakes or pushing outwards into lines and patterns.

“The Genetically Modified Forest” is a thing of beauty—who can resist the allure of gold?—but it carries a warning. The stakes are sharp and pointed at the top. And as many fairytale heroines have found, all that glitters is not really gold.

As Pluguez notes in an artist statement, the piece “speaks of man’s limited abilities to deal with his own planet.” We may think we can clear-cut our real forests with impunity or that we can dump coal dust into our streams, a practice lately authorized by our new leaders in Washington.

We can’t disobey the laws of nature for long. When we pollute our rivers, we lose our drinking water, and when we ax our trees, we lose their life-giving abilities to filter out carbon dioxide from the air and provide us with oxygen. A pretty fake forest is no substitute for a real one.

Even so, Pluguez’s meditative installation is a paean to the beauty and stillness of the natural world, properly preserved. It’s the anchor for a group show about nature aptly called Stillness; all four of its artists create a sense of calm in works that cover landscape, animals and the human body.2

1https://www.pay-equity.org/day.html
2http://www.tucsonweekly.com/tucson/all-that-glitters/Content?oid=7599592

Electronics

January 6, 2017

Suppose that aliens (not Mexicans or Muslims, but those from Outer Space) came in flying saucers and disrupted our earth’s electrical and magnetic fields?  It would crash our defenses and worldwide communications!  OMG!  No internet!  No phone, no messages, no twitter, no snapchat, no facebook, no google…

I’ve had my first smart phone for probably less than a year.  I decided, as part of a New Year’s resolution to get more current, to put all of my schedule on the phone’s calendar.  My phone had said that I was almost out of memory, so I deleted all of my messages, sent emails, deleted emails, and even photos, including a couple of phone photos (which I only recently have begun taking, as it’s more convenient than a camera) that I thought I had emailed to myself to drop into my desktop photo file.  Then, a week ago, I could no longer get or send emails with my phone.  Had not depended upon that before, having both a tablet and a desktop, but the email I had thought had gone through hadn’t.  It was in the Sent folder as failed.  And it wouldn’t let me download the photos, either.  Bother.

So… I called the techie (who was not in India, but Texas), and after she had waved her magic wand and some such, said that I would have to reboot the phone, and sent a page of directions.  Got them from my desktop email and followed instructions.  My phone email now worked (‘cept the one with the photos was gone, so you’ll have to imagine the Catalina Mountains shrouded with clouds, and a young man, in a chair at Dillard’s on its 75% day after New Year’s off sale, with a huge pile of women’s clothes in his lap, which family members are adding to).

And… you guessed it – my calendar was now empty and I had to find all of the dates and times which I had entered to reenter.  Took a long time.  Here are some events you might be interested in.  First, a free documentary film The World According to Monsanto tonight (January 6, 2017) at 6:30 at Green Fields School auditorium6000 N Camino De La Tierra, Tucson.  Here is some backstory:

Multinational chemical corporation Mon$anto has plans to move into the Tucson area (1.5 miles away from Marana High School) and is seeking a 66% tax break (also known as “Project Corn”) from the Pima County Board of Supervisors.
Come to this free movie screening of “The World According to Monsanto” documentary and find out what kind of neighbor Mon$anto is and what you can do about it.
This movie screening will take place in a large auditorium with hundreds of seats in northwest Tucson (near Orange Grove and I-10).
After the movie, Going Against GMOs author Melissa Diane Smith will give an update on the local grassroots movement that’s building against Mon$anto’s plans: She’ll provide details about five open public meetings—one in each district—that begin January 9th to the 19th and explain many different ways to take action against Mon$anto.
This must-not-miss community event is organized by concerned citizens of Pima County in cooperation with GMO Free Arizona, GMO Free Baja Arizona, March Against Monsanto Tucson, and Organic, Sustainable Baja Arizona.
https://www.facebook.com/events/153079711842632/

monsantoNext, Public meetings on Monsanto proposal begin next week in Pima County. For those who live around me,  5 p.m., Monday, Jan. 9, Oro Valley Public Library, 1305 W. Naranja Drive.  More backstore here: http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/public-meetings-on-monsanto-proposal-begin-next-week-in-pima/article_7867ea4f-614d-530c-afe4-10aa5b2a71c3.html

Then there’s Tucson’s version of the Women’s March on Washington:

The Women’s March will begin at 10 a.m. on Jan. 21 at Armory Park, 221 S. Sixth Street, and proceed for just over a half-mile to the Joel D. Valdez Library Park, 101 N. Stone Avenue, where marchers will join the Tucson Solidarity Rally at noon.1

In DC there shall be…

…more than 100,000 people [who] have registered their plans to attend the Women’s March on Washington in what is expected to be the largest demonstration linked to Donald Trump’s inauguration and a focal point for activists on the left who have been energized in opposing his agenda.2

That’s all for now.  More next week.

1http://www.arizonawomensmarch.com/tucson
2https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/it-started-with-a-grandmother-in-hawaii-now-the-womens-march-on-washington-is-poised-to-be-the-biggest-inauguration-demonstration/2017/01/03/8af61686-c6e2-11e6-bf4b-2c064d32a4bf_story.html?utm_term=.d267458cd2b6

Meltdown

October 24, 2016

Had to wait until after I had seen SNL’s take on the third debate

ht_snl_dc_161023_12x5_1600

http://www.popsugar.com/news/SNL-Video-Making-Fun-Trump-Third-Presidential-Debate-42603295
and, of course, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert  https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wMAuk5D6h1w, to post.  The debate itself made me sick to my stomach.

Pick a decade and see what each of the candidates was up to.

Closer to Home

I started reading over all of my voting mailings and was aghast by Oro Valley’s Proposition 439.  The Future General Plan asks for high-quality parks, the best streets in the region, and good schools.  Just good.  Not high-quality, not the best in the region. Unfortunately, I don’t know what the previous General Plan said – mediocre schools? What a great place to live.

Vote Early, and Vote Often

Not really – that’s the tongue-in-cheek political motto of Chicago.  But let’s get a big turnout.  Don’t let happen what occurred in Colombia:

Voters in Colombia have rejected a landmark peace deal with Farc rebels… The deal was signed last week by President Juan Manuel Santos and Farc leader Timoleon Jimenez after nearly four years of negotiations [after a 52-year-old war]… But in a surprise result, 50.2% of voters rejected the agreement compared with 49.8% who voted for it… Turnout was low with fewer than 38% of voters casting their votes.  http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-37537252

A Chimp

September 19, 2016

SYDNEY, NSW - JULY 14: A Chimpanzee jumps at a glass screen as primatologist Dr. Jane Goodall holds a press conference at Taronga Zoo July 14, 2006 in Sydney, Australia. Dr Goodall visited the zoo to raise awareness of the plight of wild Chimpanzees. The zoo's colony of Chimps includes several family groups, and three of the oldest Chimpanzees in zoos. (Photo by Ian Waldie/Getty Images)Dr. Jane Goodall held a press conference at Taronga Zoo July 14, 2006 in Sydney, Australia.  (This was on NPR today.  Photo by Ian Waldie/Getty Images)

Donald Trump’s antics remind famed anthropologist Jane Goodall of the primates she spent decades studying in the wild.

“In many ways the performances of Donald Trump remind me of male chimpanzees and their dominance rituals,” Goodall told The Atlantic. “In order to impress rivals, males seeking to rise in the dominance hierarchy perform spectacular displays: stamping, slapping the ground, dragging branches, throwing rocks.”

Goodall added, “the more vigorous and imaginative the display, the faster the individual is likely to rise in the hierarchy, and the longer he is likely to maintain that position.”

the-donaldA friend of mine had posted this on her Facebook page:

 

Entomologando

A friend of mine posted this video on her Facebook page. What a great website!bug
https://www.facebook.com/entomologando/videos/1363242347038096/

Reminds me of a U of A Humanities Seminars class I took entitled What’s Bugging You: Insects and Culture.1

Oro Valley

My brother shall be visiting and he’s flying into the Phoenix airport. I was looking for a possible van to bring him here, and on tripadvisor.com found this question:

I am actually staying in PHX, but may make it to Oro Valley to purchase something. Is it an Indian Reservation?

1https://notesfromthewest.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/entomophagy/

Fourth of July in Oro Valley

July 5, 2016

Last night Oro Valley (just north of Tucson) had a July 4th celebration at a park next to the high school which included many food vendors, live music, bouncing castles and a climbing wall for the kids, and fireworks provided by the Hilton El Conquistador Resort at 9pm. We (my daughter and husband and their three kids and me) got there about 6:30 for pizza for the kids and BBQ for the adults, except I decided to try Venezuelan food – carne Arepamechada (Venezuelan shredded beef) arepa and a malta.

The Arepa is a staple of Venezuelan cuisine, and often compared to a taco.  However, there are a few key differences between the two that make the arepa stand out as the tastier option. The shell is a soft dough made from soaked, ground kernels of corn maize, which is placed on the griddle, giving the arepa its signature grill lines. It’s then filled with a variety of ingredients ranging from meat to veggies, cheese, and sauce.
http://www.businessinsider.com/arepa-venezuelan-food-2015-12

Malta is a lightly carbonated non-alcoholic malt beverage, brewed from barley, hops, and water much like beer; corn and caramel color may also be added.

jenga 2The park was packed (500?  800? more?) with a nice melange of people – white, black, Hispanic, Asian, little kids to seniors, two guys in wheelchairs, at least half of the people wearing red, white, and blue.  A black kid with a mohawk, a woman with half of her hair purple, a couple of little girls in special flag dresses, many adult in the fashionable torn jeans with T-shirts, two crying kids talking to a female police officer who was reassuring them that she’d find their mother. Baseball caps being worn frontwards and backwards, firemen giving little kids red plastic fire fighter’s helmets. A couple of Asian women speaking Chinese, a mixed group of young kids playing a four-foot jenga (hadn’t brought my camera – this from the internet to give you an idea – the kids in the park were playing on grass).

After the two jumping castles and the climbing wall and the stringing of two patriotic necklaces (the face-painting line was way too long), we set up our blanket and fold-up camp chairs next to the family of a friend of my youngest grandchild, who we ran into.  Bought rather expensive icies as it was still hot even with the sun going down, listened to the bands, the singing of the national anthem, and then the lights went off and the fireworks from the nearby resort started.

We couldn’t see the low ones behind the trees, but even with just the high ones it was a very impressive show.  Somebody said there were three times the fireworks as last year. Much better than the Marriott Starr Pass Resort I had watched for years from my last house1, when I wasn’t in California or Vancouver. (We did laugh that we would have had a better view from my present rental, as I’m practically across the street from the Hilton El Conquistador Resort.)

1 Couldn’t find any photo of fireworks from the Starr Pass Resort from the Fourth of July, but here are some from February 2013 (don’t remember the reason.)
\https://notesfromthewest.wordpress.com/2013/02/25/february-fireworks/