Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

My Favorite Things

March 13, 2019

I started this blog two weeks ago.  Thought I just ought to post it, even if incomplete.  I didn’t even mention art or books or travel or bugs or gardening or bobcats and javelinas…

A cousin (one of my favorites) emailed me after my last (downer) post: And yet, we must find the delights in life or ….  So here are a few of my favorite things:

Humor.  As in the book, Tonight with John Oliver Presents A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo:

A children’s picture book released by comedian John Oliver about a gay bunny has hit the top spot on Amazon, outselling a vanilla version featuring US vice-president’s Mike Pence’s pet rabbit.

The satirical doppelganger… was strategically released by the British late-night TV host a day before Marlon Bundo’s A Day in the Life of the Vice President, which was written by Pence’s daughter Charlotte and illustrated by his wife, Karen.

Within two days of its release, Oliver’s Marlon Bundo had sold 180,000 copies on Amazon and become the bestselling book on the site, outstripping the Pence version which at the time of writing languished in fourth place.

The Pence book tells the tale of Marlon Bundo trailing his master for a day, but Oliver’s version, written by comedian and staff writer Jill Twiss, is about “a lonely bunny who lives with his grampa, the vice-president of the United States” who one day “falls in love with another boy bunny”.  gay-rabbit

Also, this is a great video of John Oliver being interviewed about Marlon Bundo on Late Night with Seth Meyers: John Oliver on Late Night.

Snow.  (Photos from my family room two Fridays ago.  The yard snow was gone by mid-day, but it took a few days for the north side of the Catalinas to melt.)  I liked sledding and ice-skating when I was a kid in Michigan.  In fact, my parents would flood our back yard for a “rink” and we pretended to play hockey with the kids on the block.  One night, when I was at Michigan State, Lansing had three feet of snow overnight.  MSU had to close, even though it had 21 snow plows.  What fun!  Also took figure skating while at MSU.  (When my daughter was in elementary school I drove her to Phoenix for a class when she wanted to give figure skating a whirl.  The first lesson was how to fall – she refused.  Said she’d never fall, and she didn’t.  Don’t think she ever fell skiing either.)

We would go up to Mt Lemmon every February, because there would always be snow.  (Photo of my daughter with a snowman.)  So we decided built a cabin in Summerhaven after our son was born.  I taught the kids to ski there, although I was dreadful myself, having had only a few lessons from a boyfriend on what was a very low “mountain” outside Detroit.

Relatives and Friends.  I adore my brother, despite the fact that he was always beating me.  I was awarded a $300 bond for winning the poster contest – I have no color photo of it; he got actual cash for $300 his National Art Scholastic win.  I once beat him at tennis, but then needed surgery on my elbow, after catching one of his serves backhand.  I did pretty well in architecture by end of my career, but at that point my brother was making four times what I did directing commercials! This is one of his best (make sure you have your sound on): Honda Eraser

I could go on and on about my two kids, three grandkids, favorite cousins, and old and new friends, but will have to do that at another time.  However, must put in a photo of my son, in his lab about 15 years ago, to give him equal time with his sister (above):

Tennis.  I’ve always loved tennis.  I grew up in Detroit and bicycled to a city park in the summer when in junior high to take free lessons (at least that was my recollection from the late 50’s) and earned a spot on my high school team.  During the summer played on the Detroit team, and my couch, a student at Michigan State, said I could make the MSU team.  Problem was, I needed to work through college, so had no time for sports.  But after I settled in Tucson, I played at the Racquet Club for many years with friends; my son did All-Sports Camp there during the summer, and my daughter did the tennis program after-school every day when she was in high school. When I was working one my architecture degree I played on the Racquet Club team. (As competition was in the morning, I couldn’t do it when I was working.)  But when I was working in South Carolina, played on my company’s team – we practiced after work and competed on the weekends.  That ended when I returned to Arizona.  Hadn’t played in ten years until my daughter suggested we start back up, so I’m taking one to two clinics a week to try to recreate my game. I’m sore most of the time but love it. Was 30 degrees when I left home two Sundays ago to play, but got warm enough in our sun to shed the warm-up suit.

Chocolate.  It’s supposed to make you feel like you’re in love.

Phenylethylamine is sometimes called “the love drug”, because it arouses feelings similar to those that occur when one is in love. Another neurotransmitter, serotonin, is a mood-lifter, as well. One chemical that causes the release of serotonin into the brain is tryptophan, found in (wait for it!) chocolate.

I try to eat chocolate every day – it’s easy to make pots de creme au chocolate, which are marvelous with whipped cream.  Sliced pear goes nicely with dark chocolate for dessert.  Looking through a Living (Martha Stewart) magazine in the dentist’s office yesterday, saw a recipe for Triple Chocolate Brownie Bars (pictured right) which was not hard to make!  Even talked my mother into making me a Flourless Chocolate Cake one year for my birthday.  Death by chocolate!

Positivity.  As Nicholas Kristof’s column “Why 2018 Was the Best Year in Human History”. progress-poverty-health

Cooking.  I’ve gone through many different episodes, including Julia Child for many years, starting in college (yes, chapter by chapter, which got a bit much in the souffles), and many years of curries after living in Jamaica, which included making my own curry powder.  A few years ago I got away somewhat from my Mediterranean cookbook to The Pleasures of Cooking for One and Radically Simple.  Although, as many people whose cookbooks are falling apart are doing, I’m simply Googling.  Like what to do with mizuna, as I have so much of it and it’s bolting now.

Architecture.  I had been a math and an English teacher, and then a computer programmer which I quite enjoyed (until IBM left town and my spouse-at-the-time didn’t want to move), just as I still enjoy math games.  But then I went into architecture, later in life, and really really loved it.  Bad luck for the youngsters in my class, trying to date simultaneously, with their brains rattled (been there, done that), as I was top of my class.  Designing microchip factories with Fluor wasn’t a lark, but it was so engaging to work in Taiwan and Micronesia (not so much Dublin or São Paulo), and designing US embassies was interesting (Kazakhstan, Haiti, and Jamaica) but the most fun I’ve ever had in life was designing two houses for myself (on the side, while working full time). Above, my first house.  Fifteen years later when I was working on my program to teach 3D CAD (which was also a lot of fun), I did the above house in 3D.  Here is a rendering (not a photograph) of the living room/ dining room:

Diving.  Scuba diving opens up a whole new world, and is very calm.  This trip to Fiji wasn’t my favorite fiji-day-5, but it’s the only one I blogged.  The best was Palau, on a live-aboard, with friends, diving with my son.  If I had a dive partner, I’d go again to some exotic locale, but haven’t had one in a number of years.

When the dog bites,
When the bee stings,
When I’m feelin’ sad,
I simply remember my favorite things,
And then I don’t feel so bad…

National Emergency

February 14, 2019

I hardly think that migrants fleeing from violence in their countries, applying for asylum in the US, are our National Emergency.  Our mass killing are.

Today, Valentine’s Day, is the anniversary of the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting, although I wish they’d call these murders instead of making them sound like a day at the shooting range.  Seventeen students and staff members dead, seventeen others wounded.  There were ±307 mass shootings in the US in 2018, depending on how you define them.  This from Wikipedia:

Mass Shooting Tracker: 4+ shot in one incident, at one location, at roughly the same time.
Gun Violence Archive: 4+ shot in one incident, excluding the perpetrator(s), at one location, at roughly the same time.
Vox: 4+ shot in one incident, excluding the perpetrator(s), at one location, at roughly the same time.
USA Today: 4+ shot and killed in one incident, at one location, at roughly the same time (same as the FBI’s “mass killing” definition).
Mother Jones: 3+ shot and killed in one incident, excluding the perpetrator(s), at a public place, excluding gang-related killings.
The Washington Post: 4+ shot and killed in one incident, excluding the perpetrator(s), at a public place, excluding gang-related killings.

But all were executed by American citizens, most of whom were white males (no women).  As usual, little if anything was changed regarding our gun laws.  This also from Wikipedia re Stoneman Douglas:

Following the massacre, student survivors’ anger and frustration towards the perceived inaction of the Republican-dominated legislature on the wider issue of mass shootings and gun violence led to the founding of Never Again MSD, an organization formed by survivors and students of the shooting to demand legislative action on gun violence. On March 9, Governor Rick Scott signed a bill that raised the minimum age for buying rifles in Florida from 18 to 21. The legislation also established waiting periods and background checks for gun buyers. The law also allowed for the arming of teachers who were properly trained and the hiring of school police. [NPR had a bit on that today.]  So-called “bump stocks” would now be banned and some potentially violent or mentally unstable persons would be prohibited from possessing guns. The …NRA immediately filed a lawsuit that challenged the federal constitutionality of the age requirement clause.

Blah blah blah.  Or as the Onion headline says each time this happens,  ‘No Way To Prevent This,’ Says Only Nation Where This Regularly Happens.

My Garden

It is February and the night temps are going to dip below freezing for the third time; on Sunday I covered outdoor pots and my garden with sheets yet again.  But the mizuna has loved the rains.  (It tastes a bit like arugula but not as peppery.)  The spinach is just getting going.  I think I’ve gotten my last eggplant off my two-year-old plants.  But my brussel sprout plant (according to the map of what seeds I planted where) has yielded no sprouts, which are supposed to occur along its trunk.  (Mine v. what the plant  should look like.)  Then I happened to look at the top of the plant.  Huge cauliflower (dwarfed here by its giant leaves)!  Made cauliflower soup (for 4) with a quarter of it.

The Loft

You Tucsonans know The Loft Cinema, our art movie house.  Saturday went with friends to see Documentaries (Short Subject) nominated for this year’s Oscars.  Most were pretty depressing.

  • Black Sheep was the story of a black kid who tries to be white (down to the blue contacts!) to hang with English thugs.
  • End Game follows five people in San Francisco who are dying, who make different choices on how to die.  A few of them were at the Zen Hospice Project, which I have read about, but can’t remember when or why.
  • The next was A Night at The Garden, quite an eye-opener, as it was footage from 1939 when 20,000 Americans rallied in New York’s Madison Square Garden to celebrate the rise of Nazism.  Rather spooky, these Americans giving the Nazi salute.  It’s very short; you can watch it on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/237489146.
  • Then there’s Lifeboat: German volunteers sail to the Mediterranean to rescue refugees from sinking rafts off the coast of Libya.  It is horrible how many people are jammed into these wooded boats or inflatable rafts.
  • The last was Period. End of Sentence.  In Hapur, a rural village outside New Delhi, where a girl’s period can mean the end of her education…  a sanitary pad machine is installed [and] the women learn to manufacture and market their own pads, empowering the women of their community.

The Estrogen Hour

Went to a fundraiser for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society with friends Sunday night, as we’ve done for a few years, to which we added hors d’oeuvres and a couple of bottles of wine.  It was at Laffs and billed as Tucson’s funniest females… for this stand-up comedy.  Best year yet.  They were all good, although not all cisgen – ‘guestosteroneTempest DuJour

“She” shall also host the Very Big Show (of Support) for Planned Parenthood Advocates of Arizona at the Rialto Theatre in downtown Tucson.

Saturday, March 9, 2019
VIP Reception: 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
General Admission: 7:00 pm

You can look it up and buy a ticket if you’re interested (and I’ll go with you).

The Move

January 9, 2018

I had mentioned, in fema-flexible, that we move a bit.  Well, our office left our verdant setting, where the lease was almost up, to a building south of the downtown area, which I have been told is a hangout for ladies of the evening and purveyors of pharmaceuticals.  Not a place to be at night.  I counted the pawn shops on the road we take from the freeway to the office – five.  Then there are two buildings which advertise “dolls”,  but from the look of them, there are no cabbage patch dolls there.  Another flashes girls, girls, girls.  These, and a McDonald’s.

Yesterday it took me an hour on I-40, in stop-and-go traffic, averaging 20 mph, to get back to my Residence Inn.  I’m moving to a closer one at the end of the week.  We weren’t supposed to move to the new office until next week.

Here is a view from my new, narrower window.  Not as picturesque as the pond.

This is what I shall be missing: from my office window last week I observed, not only the morning fog, but an egret sitting on a duck decoy, daily.  We’re not sure why the decoy is tethered in the pond – maybe to indicate a pipe?  Then a squirrel scampered past on the outside window sill.  Too fast for me to grab my phone for a photo.  We’re on the third floor!  One of the guys said that squirrels can climb up a brick wall.  Why?  Just to check us out, I guess. Two cranes (much larger than egrets) below the window, one making a very raucous cry!  At lunchtime, a cluster of six egrets took a long time to stroll across the road.

Away from the office a hawk darted ahead of me at an office building where I was having a meeting.  Vultures hung in the air above the Residence Inn.  A racoon scurried across the street in front of me last night.

But no frozen iguanas!  They’re farther south.

The cold is causing frozen iguanas to fall from trees in Florida

Because of the cold temperatures sweeping the nation, iguanas are dropping out of trees like overripe mangoes, littering the ground in an apparent state of rigor mortis. One tiny detail, though: They’re probably not dead. They are, however, literally frozen.
Emily Maple, the reptile keeper at the Palm Beach County Zoo, [said that] the cold-blooded animals get “cold stunned” – that is, they basically freeze – if the temperature gets below 45 degrees Fahrenheit.
“If it’s just for a day or two they’ll just get to where they’re completely frozen in time. They’re still able to breathe. They’re still able to do bodily functions just very slow,” said Maple.

by AJ Willingham, CNN, Fri January 5, 2018

Iguanas!  I didn’t even know Florida had them.  Last time I had seen them was in the Galapagos, piled six high.  (This photo © Eric Mohl of Trans-Americas Journey – he sent me a nice email to use his photo.)  So I looked that up.  According to Wikipedia:

Due to a combination of events, the green iguana is considered an invasive species in South Florida and is found along the Gulf Coast of Florida from Key West to Pinellas County. The original small populations in the Florida Keys were stowaways on ships carrying fruit from South America.

Where I shall be leaving there are seven suite hotels on the block (most of them owned by Marriott I think, as they have been buying up the competition), and on the next street, a mall with seven restaurants.  Across  the main drag are sixteen more restaurants, spread over a few miles, from chains (such as Chuck E. Cheese, Denny’s, and Chili’s) to sushi, my favorite, Turkish, and a very good Italian.  Wonder what the next location will be like.

 

The FAAT Book

December 16, 2017

FEMA Acronyms Abbreviations and Terms.  Back in the day,  we had a couple of copies around the AFO. (Yes, it was a small but fat book!) Now I’m talking and thinking in acronyms.  One of the guys in the office today asked if I had done my WIS and ER.  I replied no, that I was working on my ESS for TRS.

Today’s instructional PA meeting was on DAC and PAAP.  (This information was not in the PAPPG.)  That’s so we can explain them at the RSM to help our applicants with their DIs and EEIs.  After that, as a PDMG, I put in a WO for an SI.  Oh – and sometime next  month well be moving from our AFO to the JFO, south of downtown.

Traffic

Driving here continues to be difficult.  The lights last at least two times longer than in Tucson, causing long backups, particularly because many of the main drags are only two lanes!  Half of our group  (such a boring word when there is a murder of crows – this photo, a parliament of owls, from Mother Nature Network1) won’t use I-4;  we can watch the congestion from our window.  I have recently seen the results of two crashes, and (luckily I was going in the opposite direction) an ambulance attempting to get through a few miles of four lanes of stopped traffic!

Regrets about Egrets

Wanted to add this great photo of tick birds in Flora and Fauna in the blog,   fast-and-furious/, but knew that one is required to obtain permission to use copyrighted photos.  Emailed the photographer the end of last month and just got this from him:

Lynne,
I sincerely apologize for not responding sooner. I’m sure you’ve already  made other arrangements, but if not feel free to use my image for your work.

I was in Uganda for 3 weeks, and I did see your message in one of my brief wifi windows, but was pretty busy at the time and it totally slipped my mind after that.

Again, very sorry to have not responded promptly.
Michael Todd
Jackson, TN

What a lovely note!  Uganda is on my bucket list.  (You can click on the image to see it better.)

Holiday Shopping

My children have always been easy to buy for – they just give me lists.  And this year it was gift certificates for specific stores so that they may pick out wardrobe items.  I went to the very large mall a mile or two from here and picked up those and my son’s requested book.  It was actually fun!  And ordered one toy online.  The day after I get home for my Xmas sojourn I’ll take the grandkids out to choose their other gifts.

Cooking

One of my favorite recent (post-divorce) cookbooks has been The Pleasures of Cooking for One by Judith Jones, who had gotten Judith Child’s book, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, published.  Julia’s had been my second cookbook, many many many years ago, and I bought three more of hers.  But I’ve always thought to write to Judith, because even though I loved the book, the pages fell out almost immediately.   Was thinking of her the other day, and found that she had recently died.  Wikipedia said nice things about her:

Judith Jones (March 10, 1924 – August 2, 2017) was an American writer and editor, best known for having rescued The Diary of Anne Frank from the reject pile. Jones also championed Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking.  She retired as senior editor and vice president at Alfred A. Knopf in 2011. Jones was also a cookbook author and memoirist.

Jones’s relationship with Julia Child similarly began when Jones became interested in Child’s manuscript Mastering the Art of French Cooking, which had been rejected by a publishing house. After her years in Paris, Jones had moved to New York, where she was frustrated with the ingredients and recipes commonly available in the U.S. Jones said of the book Mastering the Art of French Cooking, “This was the book I had been searching for,” and she got it published.

More

Moore was defeated!  According to Amber Ruffin (on Seth Meyers’ Late Night), black women pulled that off.  (Check out the video: Amber Ruffin.)  As Portia says in The Merchant of Venice,

How far that little candle throws his beams!
So shines a good deed in a naughty world.

1 Tanis Thomson/Shutterstock

SF Day Two

June 29, 2017

After a very active day yesterday, A. (six) slept in until nine!  Don’t think he’s ever done that before. Had a great breakfast at the Church Street Cafe, where the espresso drinks are labeled Fancy Drinks on the menu.  Then my brother’s son, Ian, joined us (taking the day off from work) to go to the Exploratorium.  According to Wikipedia:

The Exploratorium is a public learning laboratory in San Francisco exploring the world through science, art, and human perception. Its mission is to create inquiry-based experiences that transform learning worldwide.

It used to be housed in the cavernous—and very empty—Palace of Fine Arts, which was once part of the 1915 Panama Pacific International Exposition in Golden Gate Park.  Took my kids there many years ago.  Now it’s on Pier 15 along San Francisco’s Embarcadero.  We took a trolley to get there.  They run up and down Market Street, the Embarcadero, and Fisherman’s Wharf, and are restored vintage trolleys from all over the world.  (See these pictures: streetcars.)

A. had another pal now, and the two of them dashed around from exhibit to exhibit while my brother and I lagged behind, reading some of the text.  (The purpose of the interactive exhibits, of course, if to learn why something happens.)

Here are A. and Ian in a parabolic mirror, and (right) watching their slow motion video.  Then my strobe light photo, and Ian taking a photo of his.

 

Next, my brother viewing his stop-action photo, the water drop image of him upside down.

We ate lunch at the SeaGlass Restaurant there, the sushi chef (at left in this photo from their website) making a dish for me and A.  Ian got a nice vegetarian dish (which could have been Mexican, as he and his girlfriend had spent six months in Mexico City last year).  Forgot what my brother got, but it included french fries.

We continued dashing about, until the dissection of a cow’s eye, where we sat, upstairs, and which was very interesting.  Can’t even start to relate all of the exhibits we saw, but we were there for over five hours.

Then we had to catch a trolley back to The Castro to meet Ian’s girlfriend, J., for dinner.  First trolley too full for the four of us to squeeze on.  The next one, just as crowded, didn’t bother to stop.  So we thought to hail a cab.  Only two went by us, and they were full.  Finally Ian called an Uber driver.   Then we were caught in rush hour traffic (which is why a trolley would have been better, but the next one was in half-an-hour).  Were twenty minutes late for our six o’clock reservation.  Luckily they held the table at Pauline’s Pizza.  (Homegrown ingredients go into the pies & salads at this family-friendly pizzeria with a wine room.)  Ian and J. are vegetarians, so we all split two pizzas, one with a Salted Meyer Lemon Puree, blueberries, mint, and goat cheese (yummy!), the other asparagus, kale, and something else that was green (the Green of the Day?).  Plus nice wines.  We walked back to our motel and A. got to bed a bit late.

Had to get up early for the drive to the Oakland airport.  A. and I had our breakfast there.  Had our lunch (not much, as we were still full!) in Los Angeles, then the final flight home.  (No delays!)  What a nice week.

https://www.exploratorium.edu/

Attack of the Crane Flies

March 10, 2015

250px-CraneFlyThe crane flies have been all over the house and attacking the windows for about a week.  According to Wikipedi, Although crane flies look like mosquitoes, they do not bite humans. Adult crane flies do not eat at all; most adult crane flies only mate and then die.  The larva eat the roots of grass so they no doubt love the golf courses here.  Looked at old blogs — didn’t mention crane flies last year.   Maybe was too busy to notice.  But two years ago they showed up in April, not March.  This must be a warmer year, climate change and all.  (For all of you folks back east, buried in snow, notice that I didn’t say global warming.)

Spring

meadow 011
Imeadow 003t’s spring, and with the bit of rain we’ve had, the flowers (mostly alyssum) that I seeded in my “meadow ” are thick, as well as the volunteers in my vegetable garden, from snapdragons that I’d planted years ago to wildflowers, California bluebells (shown here), desert verbena with both thin and wide leaves.    Plus my Lady Banks rose, which I have tied up
to the back fence, is roses 007 starting to bloom more than it ever has before.  BTW, this website is good for identifying flowers and recommending ones to plant: http://www.cvwd.org/conservation/lush_book/lush3_8.html

But even nicer to look at than flowers are the bicyclists of spring, packs of svelte bodies clad in lycra, riding up or down Anklam, taking in Gates Pass.

Seen yesterday: six cars stopped on the main drag through Starr Pass (a road with very little traffic) as a small herd of javelina crossed the street.

Life In The Universe

This week’s lecture, Intelligent Life Beyond Earth by Christopher D. Impey, University Distinguished Professor, Astronomy, was killed dinosaursthe best!  Chris has such a great sense of humor. (65 million years ago a comet killed off the dinosaurs; unfortunately it missed Barney.)  You must watch the podcasts.  All are on this site except for this one, which should be there in a week:
http://cos.arizona.edu/connections/life-in-the-universe
Here is the introductory spiel:

One question rises above all others when it comes to our place in a vast and ancient Universe, ‘Are we alone?’ With a billion habitable locations in the Milky Way galaxy, and more than ten billion years for biological experiments to play out, a search for intelligent life beyond Earth is well-motivated. Unfortunately, the single example of life on Earth gives no clear indication of whether intelligence is an inevitable or an extremely rare consequence of biological evolution. The search for extraterrestrial intelligence, or SETI, is more appropriately called the search for extraterrestrial technology. So far, the search for intelligent aliens by their electromagnetic communication has met with half a century of stony silence. It’s challenging to define life, and even more difficult to make general definitions of intelligence and technology. We’ll look at the premises and assumptions involved in the search, the strategies used, and the profound consequences of making contact.

He also mentioned that, according to the eminent physicist Stephen Hawking, “If aliens visit us, the outcome would be much as when Columbus landed in America, which didn’t turn out well for the Native Americans,” … He argues that, instead of trying to find and communicate with life in the cosmos, humans would be better off doing everything they can to avoid contact.

Scandalous Women

This week we discussed the movie Mildred Pierce,  with Joan Crawford, 1945.  Here is some of the editing that was done:

Mildredmildred pierceApparently the book would not have passed The Code.  So, in addition to the language being cleaned up, the panoply of screen writers (including the uncredited William Faulkner and Catherine Turney), changed the plot to a murder mystery, simplified characters to make them either bad or good, and killed off one of the “bad guys”.  It was a box office hit, and won many Oscars.  You can get it from the library or Netflix.

CSA

This is what I picked up at the CSA today: Beets, Carrots, Collard Greens (which I traded for more beets, as I can cook them and freeze them), Hakurei Turnips, Navel Oranges, Salad Mix, Sweet Potatoes, Swiss Chard.  Lots of veggies to finish before the weekend, when I leave to visit my brother during spring break.

Reading

You don’t have to see a picture of James Beard to know what he looks like, just read the descriptions of his breads in Beard on Bread, [They] should be eaten fresh, with plenty of good sweet butter.

Mostly plants

February 24, 2015

Picked from my garden yesterday: lots of arugula, spinach and peas.  Eight pea plants but after shelling the pods, only a cup and a half.  Not only is my refrigerator crisper overflowing (from the CSA greens), but my two composters are almost full from kitchen trimmings!  Am just starting to dig it into my garden.  But still have to wait for a few items to ripen.  Seems funny that I pulled dandelions a week ago and got a bunch of dandelion greens from the CSA (albeit professional dandelion greens) last week.  Pulled London rocket, a weed that is growing crazy around town with our winter rains – it’s also called also called wild arugula, and my garden is replete with domesticated arugula.

Made a soup, from a new recipe, with my peas and spinach, lamb meatballs, and lemon (did I mention that friend N had given me two dozen lemons from her tree?) but it was thickened with rice flour which gave it that shiny appearance mustardthat Chinese soups have that have been thickened with cornstarch.   Plus I added bland leafy greens  (yes – from the CSA) that I needed to use up.  Now I have three servings of a soup which I don’t like – what a waste of those peas.  Was it because of the lamb, the bland greens (which they told me today, when I asked, are a leaf mustard, shown here), or the rice flour?

Just found out that I can put my CSA membership on hold!  I should do that every other week.  Either that or I have to start eating salad for breakfast too.  Today I picked up bunches of Beets, Broccolini, Carrots, Purple Top Turnips, and I’Itoi Onions, and Navel Oranges (3), Romaine Lettuce (2 heads), Sweet Potatoes (3).  Making a turnip frittata for dinner, and a salad, of course.

Hawks

HeneryhawkI have wondered if my cat has been spending more time indoors as the Cooper’s hawk (which is also called a chicken hawk, but doesn’t look at all like Looney Tunes’ Henery Hawk, shown here) has been sitting on the parapet of my house, and in the large mesquite tree next to the back yard.  One it even swooped diagonally across my deck, under the ceiling!  But I think a cat is too large and feisty for a Cooper’s.  Yesterday I saw two hawks in the mesquite.  Spring mating, I gather.  (Too difficult to take a photo through the branches.)

Cooler weather

After a few weeks of temps in the low 80’s, high 70’s, today’s high of only 58° (because of the rain) is a bit of a change.  But heard on the radio this weekend that areas of the northeast, with the windchill factor included, would be 30° below.  My condolences to my friends back east! This from Saturday:

Hundreds of daily record lows and at least three all-time record lows were set as a frigid air mass with a connection to Siberia gripped the central and eastern United States with dangerously cold conditions. Friday morning brought the most widespread and intense cold of the winter to many areas, sending temperatures into the 30s below zero as far south as Kentucky.
http://www.weather.com/storms/winter/news/arctic-blast-record-lows-midwest-south-northeast

Community Supported Agriculture

February 20, 2015

I don’t remember life being so rushed before, even when I had two kids and worked full-time and did volunteer work, as well as entertaining friends.  Why?  It’s the CSA1.  I joined two weeks ago and I have never spent so much time in the kitchen, making salads and soups.

(According to the US Department of Agriculture, a woman my age should eat, in a week, 1½ cups of Dark green vegetables, 4 cups of Red and orange vegetables, 1 cup of Beans and peas, 4 cups of Starchy vegetables, and 3½ cups of Other vegetables2.  I’m going to be so healthy that I’ll outlive my savings!  But Michael Pollan, whose book I mentioned in a blog3, and who said Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. would be proud of me.)

This week I gave half of my daikon with greens to the Japanese woman I work with, but she brought me two of the rice balls she made with the greens the next day.  Give greens away, they bounce back.  Yesterday I gave her two bunches of my own mizuna, Japanese mustard greens.  (Doesn’t help that I am growing too much mizuna, arugula, and spinach in my garden.  Replete with greens!)

I’ve frozen five helpings of soup so far (and shall shortly run out of containers), but still have so many bags of luscious organic greens that the crisper drawer in the refrigerator has overflowed!

Borrowed an onion from my neighbor (no onions from the CSA) but she refused mickey-mouse-sorcerers-apprenticegreens in trade.  Have been giving my two carpoolers arugula for weeks, but feel like Micky Mouse in The Sorcerer’s Apprentice.  (Can you hear the music as the greens flow over me?)

Another comparison would be like having a subscription to the New Yorker magazine.  It’s a weekly that should be a monthly; only shut-ins could keep up!  But at least you can read the current news and save the fiction for another year; I don’t have a large enough freezer for six weeks, the minimum subscription, of soup.  Note: the soup I’m having tonight, Coconut Cilantro Potato, is delicious.  You can check out the CSA website below for the recipe.  (I had salad too, of course.)

Life in the Universe4

Last week’s lecture was Life on Earth: By Chance or By Law, by Brian J. Enquist, Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

Life on Earth is amazing and multifaceted. Ultimately all of life has descended from one common ancestor and has been guided by evolution by natural selection.

I took no notes, remembering only that it was good, and that climate change will create further evolution.  And that all animals have a bit fewer than a billion heartbeats in life (a hummingbird has a shorter life because its heart beats so fast – click on cartoon5 to read it better), except humans and chickens which have over two billion. Go figure.

heartbeats

Last Monday’s lecture by Anna R. Dornhaus, Associate Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, was Complexity and Evolvability: What Makes Life So Interesting?  She studies insects and is into complex behavior.

Humans are also involved in pretty complex behavior.  As a mathematician I especially like the Mandelbrot set (the set of values of c in the complex plane for which the orbit of 0 under iteration of the complex quadratic polynomial: z_{n+1}=z_n^2+c). Anna had some nice diagrams, this being one6:

Mandelbrot_set_image

Plus I was fascinated with the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency which commissions advanced research for the DoD, Department of Defense) horse robot:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40gECrmuCaU

Scandalous Females in Film

For those of you who are not interested in Mandelbrot or DARPA, I’ll note a few items from my Humanities Seminar.  I am large, I contain multitudes… (from Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself.)

First-wave feminism, which was active during the 19th and early 20th century, focused mainly on suffrage and gender equality.

Second-wave feminism, which started in the 60’s, was characterized by unruly women such as Roseanne, Maud, and Murphy Brown.  (Remember Dan Quayle vs. Murphy Brown, The Vice President takes on a TV character over family values?  Because Murphy, who wore masculine clothes, was an unwed mother.  She rejected abortion!)  Also Enjoli (remember its commercial song, I can bring home the bacon…6), Virginia Slims, and Mary Tyler Moore from the 70’s and 80’s.

Third-wave feminism started in the 90’s and was characterized by Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Emma Watson speaking of her HeForShe Campaign at the UN7, as well as Katniss and SNL’s Kristen Wiig in the female Hangover, Bridesmaids.  There is discussion on whether Beyoncé could be considered a feminist with the way that she dresses.  Then there are Tina Fey and Amy Poehler hosting the 2015 Golden Globes8.  (If it seems like I’m focusing a bit much on women in the movies – the class is entitled Scandalous Females in Film.)
beyonceFeministHAHAHAHA

1http://www.tucsoncsa.org/
2http://www.choosemyplate.gov/food
3https://notesfromthewest.wordpress.com/2015/01/23/state-of-the-union-reading/
4http://cos.arizona.edu/connections/life-in-the-universe
5http://abominable.cc/post/56335701669/average-life-expectancy
6http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandelbrot_set#mediaviewer/File:Mandelbrot_set_image.png By Binette228 (Own work)
7https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Q0P94wyBYk
8https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkjW9PZBRfk
9https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aw-wODbjmZI

 

Pumpkins

October 15, 2014

I especially miss the grandkids on holidays, like Halloween.  Used to go to Willcox to pick pumpkins1.  Now they’re doing it in Idaho.  (Daughter’s photos of herself and youngest in pumpkin patch, with oldest two painting pumpkins.)
lis & aidenlis & kids
This I don’t miss.  (From my daughter’s Facebook page.)  Luckily she’s a nurse…

It’s amazing some children survive until adulthood. Aiden fell off an approximately 12′ retaining wall today straight down onto his face. It could have been MUCH worse but there was a lot of blood and some temporary panicking about head injury…

This child is “Scarface” in my blog from April, 20132.  But he’s also cute (also from my daughter’s Facebook page):

Aiden’s teacher told me today that he reported to her that In Our garden we are growing tomatoes, cucumbers, and bikinis.

October 13, 2014

Went to Home Depot today for my almost-weekly trip for gardening supplies, and not only did they have a huge display of pumpkins and assorted Halloween folderol but they had a huge display of Xmas trees and lights.  Am thinking of boycotting them until after Thanksgiving (when I think Xmas displays should be allowed).

Tendonitis

Yes, I still have it.  But these are good for it:

>A two-hour lunch (Zona 78 – split a very good pizza) with friend B* on a rainy day
>An eight-hour day of work at the college
>Salonpas, a pain reliever patch that the tree trimmer (actually owner of the company – two others did all of the extensive work) recommended – took two out of the envelope and gave me the rest.  Totally marvelous!
>Tucson Meet Yourself on a beautiful autumn day (with friend R and her mother-in law V** – bought food that V had never had from many different countries such as Mexican horchata, Laotian eggrolls, Turkish dolmates, Polish pierogi (some potato, some mushroom), and French pear clafouti3)
>Lunch (Prep & Pastry – very good, as usual) and a movie (The Two Faces of January, a psychological thriller based on the 1964 novel, at the Loft)  with friend N

Bad for it:

>Exercise class at the Y
>Yard work
>House work

*B had good suggestions about water heaters.  First: turn them when you’re on vacation, and during the summer.  (Who needs a hot shower in the summer?  Who uses anything but cold water to wash clothes?  And the dishwasher heats its own water.  Second: if you have an electric water heater, buy a timer (like the one you put on lights in your house when you’re gone) and only turn hot water heater on, in the winter, when you’ll be taking showers, such as in the morning.

**Have to repeat story that V (pushing 90) told:
Her son had given her her first cell phone, with a cat meow for a ring tone.  (Think I want one of those!)  She wasn’t well acquainted with it and neglected to turn it off in church.  Of course it started meowing during the sermon.  Three meows, with many people looking around for the cat, before she could get it out of her purse and turned off.

Leif Erikson

Friends had their yearly Leif Ericson party.

Leif Erikson was a Norse explorer regarded as the first European to land in North America, nearly 500 years before Christopher Columbus.

Absolutely delicious Norwegian food [such as gravlaks (sweet and salty cured salmon), kjøttboller (meatballs), sursild (pickled herring),  and geitost (brown/red cheese) meatballs, but no pig’s trotter or sheep’s head], and lots of friends.

Then there are the toasts with aquavit, kind of a caraway-flavored vodka, 40% alcohol by volume.  Or other flavors; this year R made loganberry-flavored, mixing the berries and vodka himself.  People used to chug the shot of the caraway-flavored ’cause they didn’t like the taste.  Now people were enjoying the berry-flavored shots.  The toast recited was: “Din skol, min skol, alla backa flicka skol” (Here’s to you, here’s to me, here’s to all the pretty girls).

1https://notesfromthewest.wordpress.com/2011/10/24/4%E2%80%9D-o-c/
2http://notesfromthewest.wordpress.com/2013/04/11/peccaries-and-plants/
3http://www.tucsonweekly.com/TheRange/archives/2011/09/22/prepare-your-waistline-for-tucson-meet-yourself

Lost Boys of Sudan

October 8, 2014

duanyAre your kids spoiled, bored?

By the age of 14, Ger Duany had wandered barefoot for hundreds of miles through his native Sudan, spent four years in Ethiopian refugee camps and fought as a child soldier. On one occasion, he walked for so long that all his toenails fell off; on another, he fled from soldiers by swimming across a river choked with corpses. But Mr. Duany, one of thousands of so-called Lost Boys left homeless by a Sudanese civil war that began in the 1980s, isn’t one to complain.  “I would not call it a difficult life, really,” he said. “I just had a lot of challenges at a very young age.”

Goateed and cat-eyed, Mr. Duany spoke of his life… Now 35, he has a wry, winking wit, whether discussing the size of his family in Africa — 63 brothers and sisters, the progeny of his father’s nine wives — or recalling his surprise at learning how much a typical American eats, and how often

“As soon as I got here, I was a freshman in high school, even though I had never really gone to school,” he said. “I only knew my ABCs, and could barely understand what my teacher was saying. But I knew that I was smart enough to learn. I knew that I could learn, if I could just go to school and not hear gunshots.”

This is in an interesting article on one of the Lost Boys of the Sudan, in last Sunday’s NY Times, about a new movie, The Good Lie, which Ger Duany plays a character in, about Lost Boys in Kansas City1.

The Lost Boys of Sudan is the name given to the groups of over 20,000 boys of the Nuer and Dinka ethnic groups who were displaced and/or orphaned during the Second Sudanese Civil War (1983–2005); about 2.5 million were killed and millions were displaced.

Tucson Festival of Books

rock bottom retainersEvery year I volunteer for the Tucson Festival of Books.  They send me many emails, most of which I don’t read, but I found one interesting, about the Rock Bottom Remainders.  This article was in the Arizona Daily Star:

The Rock Bottom Remainders, America’s most literary oldies rock cover band, will reunite at the 2015 Tucson Festival of Books.

New York Times best-selling authors Amy Tan, Mitch Albom, Dave Barry, Scott Turow, Ridley Pearson, Ray Blount, Jr., Alan Zweibel and Greg Iles, aided by a couple of ringer musicians, including drummer Josh Kelly and Albom’s singer/actress wife, Janine Sabino Albom, will perform a 90-minute show in the University of Arizona Student Union Memorial Center ballroom to kick off the festival on March 13…

This will be the first official performance for the Rock Bottom Remainders since they called it quits in 2012 after the death of band founder Kathi Kamen Goldmark. Several members of the band, which played together for 20 years at book festivals and literature events, did an informal performance at the Miami book festival last year.

“We retired, so to speak, and the joke is now we are going to start doing the first reunion tour,” said Tan, the band’s self-appointed dominatrix, who dons a wig, knee-high boots, fishnet stockings and a whip on stage. “We’re going to be like the Rolling Stones or whatever those groups are that do those reunion tours. This is our first farewell tour.”

“As Mitch Albom says, ‘We’re such a bad band, we can’t even break up correctly’,” Barry added…

Albom recounted what Bruce Springsteen told the band several years ago, which has become something of its guiding light: “You’re not that bad, but I wouldn’t get any better. Because if you get any better, you’re just going to be another lousy band.”

“We were so bad that we were funny. But if we got any better, then we would just be lousy,” Albom explained. “So we’re ranked slightly below lousy, which apparently, according to Bruce Springsteen, is actually a pretty good place to be.”

The Rock Bottom Remainders will likely get together an hour or so before the March 13 show to rehearse. But Turow said those rehearsals will do little to improve their performance.

“Even new songs don’t get much in the way of rehearsal. … And then we get onstage and we flub,” he said with a laugh. “And even the songs that we’ve done a million times before, there’s an element of improvisation every time we perform. I never manage to come in on the right place when I’m singing, so the band has to follow me breathlessly, waiting to see when I’m going to start and what key my voice it’s going to be in that night.”

Those little imperfections are what have been the hallmarks and the joy of the band’s performances.

“ If you’re not bad and expectations are low, then what you have is a funny show,” Tan said.

According to the email,

Between them, they’ve published more than 150 titles, sold more than 350 million books, and been translated into more than 25 languages. The Festival is thrilled to offer the Tucson community and Festival guests this once-in-a-lifetime experience to see these literary lights perform live!

Date: Friday, March 13, 2015
Time: 8-9:30 pm (doors open at 7:15 pm)
Location: University of Arizona Student Union Memorial Center – Grand Ballroom
Attire: Casual concert dress
Tickets: Ticket price will be be announced in November 2014 and sales will begin on Monday, December 1 at 12:00 noon, Mountain Standard Time. Friend of the Festival members will be able to purchase tickets before general sales begin. Not a Friend? Join now!

White Pomegranate

tree 001dark plants 001

The first photo of the pomegranate and the Texas mountain laurel seeds, bright red, that I mentioned in a previous blog2.  The second of the cut pomegranate; the seeds don’t look red, but they don’t stain your hands, just your clothes.

I used to assign my son to take the seeds out of the pomegranate for the Xmas red and green salad (spinach, avocado, pomegranate seeds), so I didn’t stain my hands.

The other dish I’ve made with the seeds is a watermelon, raspberry, pomegranate seed salad with lemon and orange zest in the dressing.

1http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/28/movies/the-actor-ger-duany-reflects-on-his-journey-from-sudan.html?_r=0
2https://notesfromthewest.wordpress.com/2014/09/23/decorated-skies/