Lost Boys of Sudan

duanyAre your kids spoiled, bored?

By the age of 14, Ger Duany had wandered barefoot for hundreds of miles through his native Sudan, spent four years in Ethiopian refugee camps and fought as a child soldier. On one occasion, he walked for so long that all his toenails fell off; on another, he fled from soldiers by swimming across a river choked with corpses. But Mr. Duany, one of thousands of so-called Lost Boys left homeless by a Sudanese civil war that began in the 1980s, isn’t one to complain.  “I would not call it a difficult life, really,” he said. “I just had a lot of challenges at a very young age.”

Goateed and cat-eyed, Mr. Duany spoke of his life… Now 35, he has a wry, winking wit, whether discussing the size of his family in Africa — 63 brothers and sisters, the progeny of his father’s nine wives — or recalling his surprise at learning how much a typical American eats, and how often

“As soon as I got here, I was a freshman in high school, even though I had never really gone to school,” he said. “I only knew my ABCs, and could barely understand what my teacher was saying. But I knew that I was smart enough to learn. I knew that I could learn, if I could just go to school and not hear gunshots.”

This is in an interesting article on one of the Lost Boys of the Sudan, in last Sunday’s NY Times, about a new movie, The Good Lie, which Ger Duany plays a character in, about Lost Boys in Kansas City1.

The Lost Boys of Sudan is the name given to the groups of over 20,000 boys of the Nuer and Dinka ethnic groups who were displaced and/or orphaned during the Second Sudanese Civil War (1983–2005); about 2.5 million were killed and millions were displaced.

Tucson Festival of Books

rock bottom retainersEvery year I volunteer for the Tucson Festival of Books.  They send me many emails, most of which I don’t read, but I found one interesting, about the Rock Bottom Remainders.  This article was in the Arizona Daily Star:

The Rock Bottom Remainders, America’s most literary oldies rock cover band, will reunite at the 2015 Tucson Festival of Books.

New York Times best-selling authors Amy Tan, Mitch Albom, Dave Barry, Scott Turow, Ridley Pearson, Ray Blount, Jr., Alan Zweibel and Greg Iles, aided by a couple of ringer musicians, including drummer Josh Kelly and Albom’s singer/actress wife, Janine Sabino Albom, will perform a 90-minute show in the University of Arizona Student Union Memorial Center ballroom to kick off the festival on March 13…

This will be the first official performance for the Rock Bottom Remainders since they called it quits in 2012 after the death of band founder Kathi Kamen Goldmark. Several members of the band, which played together for 20 years at book festivals and literature events, did an informal performance at the Miami book festival last year.

“We retired, so to speak, and the joke is now we are going to start doing the first reunion tour,” said Tan, the band’s self-appointed dominatrix, who dons a wig, knee-high boots, fishnet stockings and a whip on stage. “We’re going to be like the Rolling Stones or whatever those groups are that do those reunion tours. This is our first farewell tour.”

“As Mitch Albom says, ‘We’re such a bad band, we can’t even break up correctly’,” Barry added…

Albom recounted what Bruce Springsteen told the band several years ago, which has become something of its guiding light: “You’re not that bad, but I wouldn’t get any better. Because if you get any better, you’re just going to be another lousy band.”

“We were so bad that we were funny. But if we got any better, then we would just be lousy,” Albom explained. “So we’re ranked slightly below lousy, which apparently, according to Bruce Springsteen, is actually a pretty good place to be.”

The Rock Bottom Remainders will likely get together an hour or so before the March 13 show to rehearse. But Turow said those rehearsals will do little to improve their performance.

“Even new songs don’t get much in the way of rehearsal. … And then we get onstage and we flub,” he said with a laugh. “And even the songs that we’ve done a million times before, there’s an element of improvisation every time we perform. I never manage to come in on the right place when I’m singing, so the band has to follow me breathlessly, waiting to see when I’m going to start and what key my voice it’s going to be in that night.”

Those little imperfections are what have been the hallmarks and the joy of the band’s performances.

“ If you’re not bad and expectations are low, then what you have is a funny show,” Tan said.

According to the email,

Between them, they’ve published more than 150 titles, sold more than 350 million books, and been translated into more than 25 languages. The Festival is thrilled to offer the Tucson community and Festival guests this once-in-a-lifetime experience to see these literary lights perform live!

Date: Friday, March 13, 2015
Time: 8-9:30 pm (doors open at 7:15 pm)
Location: University of Arizona Student Union Memorial Center – Grand Ballroom
Attire: Casual concert dress
Tickets: Ticket price will be be announced in November 2014 and sales will begin on Monday, December 1 at 12:00 noon, Mountain Standard Time. Friend of the Festival members will be able to purchase tickets before general sales begin. Not a Friend? Join now!

White Pomegranate

tree 001dark plants 001

The first photo of the pomegranate and the Texas mountain laurel seeds, bright red, that I mentioned in a previous blog2.  The second of the cut pomegranate; the seeds don’t look red, but they don’t stain your hands, just your clothes.

I used to assign my son to take the seeds out of the pomegranate for the Xmas red and green salad (spinach, avocado, pomegranate seeds), so I didn’t stain my hands.

The other dish I’ve made with the seeds is a watermelon, raspberry, pomegranate seed salad with lemon and orange zest in the dressing.

1http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/28/movies/the-actor-ger-duany-reflects-on-his-journey-from-sudan.html?_r=0
2https://notesfromthewest.wordpress.com/2014/09/23/decorated-skies/

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